Reviews

Review: NIGHT AND SILENCE (October Daye #12), by Seanan McGuire

 

Even risking to sound like a broken record, I need to stress once more how this series keeps raising the stakes from one book to the next, how far it is from generating any kind of “reader fatigue” and how much I keep feeling invested, as a reader and a huge fan, in the ongoing story of October and friends.

More than in previous instances, this will be a difficult book to review because talking about it without giving away any spoilers is going to be a monumental feat, but I will try anyway, focusing rather on the character development and the emotional responses engendered by this twelfth installment in what I consider one of the best Urban Fantasy series of these years.

Since the blurb on GoodReads or other sites already mentions it, I feel safe in reporting that the main focus of Night and Silence is the kidnapping of Gillian, Toby’s estranged daughter, who disappeared from the Berkley campus leaving only an empty car and some traces of blood.  After the events of the previous book, Toby and her extended family are not in the best of shape: Tybalt and Jazz are dealing with their own version of PTSD, the King of Cats more than Jazz, and the distance he’s put between himself and Toby is hurting them both, leaving them unbalanced and vulnerable.  The appearance of Cliff, Toby’s former lover and Gillian’s father, and of Miranda, Cliff’s new wife, at Toby’s door, accusing her of the girl’s disappearance, launches a breakneck chase all over San Francisco, both in the mundane parts of the city and in the fae encroaching realms – a chase that will bring to light many unexpected revelations and a couple of actual narrative bombshells.  Not to mention a lot of shed blood – and I mean a lot: this might very well be the book in which October bleeds more than in any previous installment of the series…

 

“You lost a great deal of blood.”
“I didn’t lose it,” I said. “I know exactly where it is.”

I will freely admit that at first I was not completely sold on the kidnapping angle, since this particular story-line had already been explored in a previous book, but I should not have worried – as I soon became aware – because Seanan McGuire had no intention to retread old paths and managed to lead both her characters and her readers on a breathless adventure that paves the way for a number of unpredictable scenarios that will be the fuel for the next volumes.

What Night and Silence does very well is make us think about the meaning of family, and family ties, and the detail that comes to the fore with dramatic intensity is the contrast between what I might call Toby’s ‘original’, human-oriented family, made of Cliff and Gillian, and the one she built around herself with May, Tybalt, Quentin and all the other friends she’s made along the way.  Once more we are reminded of the fact that when October came back from her involuntary 14-year stint as a fish in a pond, Cliff did not even give her the chance to explain (hard as that might have been without revealing the existence of Faerie), and literally slammed the door in her face. He does not come across as a very nice or considerate person, and here he appears as completely subjected to his wife Miranda’s will: together they have done their best (or rather, their worst) to fuel Gillian’s pain and lack of understanding for Toby’s disappearance into a full-fledged hate of the girl’s natural mother.  And once a huge revelation about Miranda’s history and motivations becomes clear, the extent of their combined efforts takes on a sinister light that made me despise them even more, particularly when I kept witnessing Toby’s resigned acceptance of Gillian’s rejection: she can fight like an enraged lioness for the sake of her child, but she will not try to change the young woman’s point of view, and that’s quite painful to see.  On the other hand, there is a very intense conversation with Cliff, at some point, where finally October makes him face his responsibilities, and it’s a welcome exchange. Much welcome.

The only bright lights in this quite bleak panorama come from Tybalt and the Luidaeg: the King of Cats might be still recovering (and it looks like it’s going to be a long, long road) from his ordeal at the hands of Amandine, he might feel diminished in his ability to be an effective ruler, but when October is in dire need of his help he does not hesitate and shows that the strength of old is still there, ready to be deployed for the sake of the woman he loves.   I make no mystery that I’m not exactly partial to romance in my reading material, but in the case of October and Tybalt I’m always ready to make an exception, and I believe that’s because their relationship feels very real, with no need for the usual frills of a romantic entanglement: they are not simply lovers, they are friends and comrades who have learned their mutual strengths and weaknesses and know how to support each other when need arises.  The combination of Toby’s cynical approach to life and Tybalt’s old-world manner of expression makes for many delightful exchanges that always bring a smile to my face.

As for the Luidaeg… well, my favorite character after October truly shines here in Night and Silence: she is her usual gruff and abrasive self of course, and that’s to be expected, but she also shows her deep capacity for love and affection that the brusque manner she uses as a cover does not mask very well. Among the many revelations offered by this book, there are some concerning the Luidaeg that shine a new light on her character and, most important, on her past and the circumstances that made her who she is, that is, besides what we already knew about her…     What the Luidaeg does here for October and her own is the proof (as if we needed one…) of her deep affection for this changeling and also of the feeling of responsibility she harbors for Toby – I would be tempted to say that she is more of a mother than Amandine could ever be, even though I can almost hear her vehement denial of this conclusion…

If The Brightest Fell ended with many unresolved question and a dark pall hanging over the characters, Night and Silence offers a slight glimmer of hope for the future: it might not look much, at face value, but the potential for the righting of some wrongs in there, even though we already know that October and her friends’ path will never be smooth or easy.  But we would not want it any other way…

 

My Rating: 

20 thoughts on “Review: NIGHT AND SILENCE (October Daye #12), by Seanan McGuire

    1. For the sake of honesty I must warn you that the first book (and the second one, in lesser measure) just pave the way for the real developments and require a leap of faith in the author, but once the story really kicks in, you will not be disappointed 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  1. You write so enthusiastically that I’m almost willing to give October a second chance… But the first book really didn’t click for me and left me completely cold (and bored) :/ Is the series getting better later on, or is it a matter of difference of tastes?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, it DOES get better: I was not impressed with book 1 myself, although it was an ok read, but having already enjoyed McGuire’s work (in her other incarnation as Mira Grant) I decided to keep reading the series, and my faith in her skills was rewarded.
      Book 2 stands on firmer ground, and from book 3 you will have forgotten all your misgivings… 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    1. There are many wonderful (and harrowing, and terrifying) surprises waiting for you along the way, and I know you will enjoy them to the fullest. I can’t wait to hear your reactions to the books you have not read yet. In my opinion this series is McGuire’s finest work indeed… 🙂

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      1. Yup, I love this series – I need to get back into it asap. I know that as soon as I pick up the next one I’ll be hooked and won’t be able to put them down. Which I think is the reason I’ve been resisting what with all the review books, but I’ve lessened my requests quite a lot so hopefully, soon.
        Lynn 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I still have hopes that I will one day catch up with this series (though I have a long way to go, having only read the first one) but it is encouraging to know that the books remain so good even into the double digits! That’s rare for a long-running UF series!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. True: series tend to stumble on repeated issues or lack of imagination, but experience with the October saga taught me that you will never, ever get bored with this story because the author always finds new ways to keep it fresh and intriguing.
      Happy reading!!!!! 😉

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  3. I’m trailing in the dust with this series – I’ve only read the first two, which I thoroughly enjoyed. But reading your wonderful review of the 12th book convinces me that I need to make a feature of catching up during 2019! Thank you for sharing:))

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m just finishing this book and I fully agree with you. In fact, I’m seriously considering relistening the whole series next year. Or at least the first book.

    Liked by 1 person

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