Reviews

FAIRY TALE, by Stephen King

Dear Mr. King,

I used to be one of your constant readers until several years ago, when a couple of disappointing books turned me away from your works, although I returned recently – mostly thanks to some reviews of your latest stories from my fellow bloggers – having discovered that you seemed to be back once again in the splendid form I enjoyed in the past.   So when your latest novel came out I did not think twice about adding it to my TBR, only to suffer an unwelcome return of that old deep disappointment.

Fairy Tale starts in a very promising manner, mostly because you choose to focus on one of the themes in which you excel, the friendship between a young boy and his crusty old neighbor: the juxtaposition between the naïveté of youth and the prickly wisdom of old age, here personified by 17-year old Charlie Reade and the elderly Mr. Bowditch, is portrayed in your usual wonderful, humorous way, and here the bond between them is also represented by Bowditch’s dog Radar, well-loved by both characters and a lovely addition to the story’s cast.  Charlie takes on the care of Mr. Bowditch after the latter’s hospitalization following a bad fall, a task the young man chooses to shoulder because of an earnest promise made in the past (and also as a form of atonement for some childish pranks he was responsible for). Fairly soon, however,  he notices that there is something weird going on in the closed shed located at the back of the garden, and after Mr. Bowditch’s demise, and the discovery that the old man willed his earthly possession to Charlie, the youth starts on a fantastical journey to another world accessed through a hole in the shed: Charlie and an ailing Radar travel to Empis in search of a magical sundial that’s able to turn back time and rejuvenate the old dog, but at the same time Charlie finds out that Empis is an imperiled world suffering under the rule of evil, and the boy is thrown into the role of Chosen One and savior of the realm…

You see, Mr. King, the first 150 pages of so of the novel were delightfully typical of your writing: I enjoyed Charlie’s back story, his need to grow up faster because of his mother’s early death and his father turning to drink to drown his despair, as I enjoyed the growing rapport between Charlie and Bowditch, the love for adorable Radar, the generational clash of two very different people who nonetheless manage to find a common ground and a basis for affection. I could have gone on reading about them for the whole length of the book, even though the weird noises coming from that shed did pique my curiosity and I looked forward to learning what kind of mystery – or horror – hid behind those doors.   And the first part of Charlie’s journey through that strange world still held my attention, mostly because I wanted him to succeed, to reach the magical sundial in time and save dear Radar.  But once that part of the quest was accomplished, things went rapidly downhill, and I felt as if I was reading a different book, written by a different author, not by you.

I’m very aware, Mr. King, that your novels tend to be lengthy, that you take your time in creating the scenery before letting us readers sink our proverbial teeth into the story proper, but the length of time and pages dedicated to Charlie’s unfortunate detention in Empis’ dungeons, waiting to be employed in some sort of perverted gladiatorial games, was frankly too much. Far too much.  And what about the emphasis about the dirtiness and squalor of the prison, or the guards’ cruelty?  We all know that dungeons are filthy, dark and horrible places, but was it really necessary to dwell so much on the… ahem… scarcity of sanitary implements in the cells, and the details of how the prisoners had to cope with what little was provided?  We all know that prison guards, particularly those in the employ of your usual Evil Lord, are quite unsavory characters, but was it really necessary to have them bask in their peculiar brand of jolly cruelty that only lacked a mustache to be twirled to complete such trite picture?  And what about some of the evil characters roaming in the doomed city? I found that your perseverance in the description of their bodily fluids or the obnoxious noises produced by any and all orifices went beyond grossness: if it wanted to be a means to stress the horror of the situation… well, what it did for me was to make me forget the horror and see only the base crudeness of it all.  Did you maybe want to make fun of those tropes Mr. King? Sorry, but to have a chance to work for me, irony should be light and pointed, and this was NOT the case…

And what about Charlie himself? Was it that same misplaced wish to parody some Fantasy themes that made you turn Charlie (who was already a bit too perfect to ring true) into a cut and dried Gary Stu? So much the fairytale hero that even his hair changed color and turned blonde to better fit the stereotype of the Savior Prince? Seriously?

And last but not least, there is one detail that truly bothered me: when Charlie reaches the realm of Empis, he finds out that he must be speaking another language, one more suited to a fantasy environment and therefore devoid of some terms and expressions typical of our day and age. All well and good, we SFF readers can accept something like that without batting an eyelash, since we’re used to suspend our disbelief: so why did you feel such a compelling need, Mr. King, to remind us so many times that Charlie uttered one specific word only to have it magically translated into Empis-speak?  Two or three examples would have been more than enough, because your readers are bright, imaginative people and know how to connect the dots: having them connected for them throughout the whole book is not simply annoying, it’s an insult to our intelligence.

I have to confess that when I reached past the middle of the book I started skipping ahead because I wanted to see how the story ended, but did not want to endure the whole journey, and when that still proved not to be enough, I skipped over the last 100-odd pages straight to the Epilogue, relieved to be literally out of the woods.  I’m sorry, Mr. King, because I wanted to like this book, I did indeed like it at the beginning, but once it turned into a crazy mess I could not take it anymore.  This does not mean that I will not read your next one, of course, only that I will try to be more careful with my expectations, in the hope that this is only a small bump in the road.

My Rating:

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26 thoughts on “FAIRY TALE, by Stephen King

  1. Awwww, that’s too bad. King just seems to hit or miss with his readers and from what I can see and tell, there’s almost no rhyme or reason to the miss’ness or hit’ness.

    Hope you have a good book to get you over this one 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. What a shame! I’m sorry to hear this was such a disappointment. I’ve only read the first 50 pages or so and was caught up in a promising story. Now I’m not sure if I’ll go back…

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Stephen King writes bestsellers. That involves following a certain proven pattern that doesn’t necessarily equals high literary standards. However, he has proven with his Dark Tower series that he’s capable of writing bestselling books that are of a high literary quality. I only had the impression that he rushed a little through the last book of the series and many people have ambivalent feelings about the ways he involved himself into the story and the way he tied up the plot.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sometimes I have the impression that, having taken his own sweet time with the world-building and the plot, he at some point loses interest and needs to… “get out” as quickly as he can. Which does not always work well….

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  4. This just solidifies my decision to not read this despite the hype. I’ve tried King before and have not been a fan, though at soem point I think I might try the Dark Tower books.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. In the past 20 or so years, King has been… well, ‘inconsistent’ is the best word I can find right now, so a few disappointments along the way are to be expected. I have not read the Dark Tower trilogy, and I might try that one as well, one of these days…. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Oof, and I had so much hope for this. I received an audio copy for review, but given how long it is, as you’ve also pointed out, it always got bumped down the tbr. Your review doesn’t make me optimistic I’ll ever read it now, it sounds absolutely torturous at the middle where you described!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. As I always caution, mileage might vary: I know I’m not the most patient of readers and that might have influenced my outlook. I’m quite eager to learn more from my fellow bloggers to see if it was just a “bump in the road” for me or if the book is not up to the usual King standards….

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  6. Brilliant review, Maddalena. I can sense your overall distress and disappointment with King’s latest novel. I can see myself as annoyed as you getting through this one. I feel like lately, he dropped back into the lower spectrum of quality stuff too. I do hope his next book, Holly, will be a better writing project. Thank you for sharing!! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

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