Review: OCCUPIED EARTH, edited by G.Phillips & R. Brewer

24612430I received this book from Edelweiss, in exchange for an honest review.

This kind of anthology is usually centered round a core theme that individual authors choose to develop as they wish, while here I found a different interpretation: there is a common background, concerning the invasion of an alien species called Makh-ra, who have conquered Earth and are ruling it and exploiting its resources.  Therefore each author had to work inside a set of pre-established parameters, giving this anthology a very different feel than usual – in other words, this reads more like a novel developed through a change of POV at each new chapter, rather than a collection of disjointed stories, and that gives it a more cohesive feel that I found quite enjoyable.

Another point of interest in these collected stories is that they don’t focus on the actual invasion: that’s already in the past, one generation removed or thereabouts. What the anthology chose to show is the aftermath, the way in which people and customs re-arrange themselves in the face of occupation, the dichotomy in outlook between those who remember life as it was pre-invasion and those, like the younger people, who have known nothing else.  The Earth that comes through these stories is quite a dismal place: the stripping of resources by the Makh-ra has generated shortages (like water, for example, that’s subject to rationing) and supplies are not as plentiful as before; cities present large ruined areas, some as the result of battles during the invasion, others because the changes in economy have decreed the end of once-flourishing activities. The separation between those with power and influence and the rest of the populace has increased, and only individuals who have chosen to collaborate with the new rulers can enjoy a semblance of normal life.

“Semblance” being the operative word here, because the Makh-ra’s rule is far from a benevolent one: the overall flavor of this situation strongly reminded me of the stories of occupied France under the Nazi invasion in WWII, with a curfew in place, strong restrictions on travel and frequent searches of places or people suspected of aiding rebels.  As it happened in that historical period, many have chosen to collaborate with the alien invaders: some for personal gain, some because they have no other choice, with all the possible variations in between the two opposites.  There are a few instances of attempts at integration as well, the case in point being that of the three-part story from the anthology’s editors, that acts as a sort of frame for the others: here a human FBI agent works side-by-side with his Makh-ra colleague, and they manage to reach a sort of mutual understanding through shared work and dangers.

In general, though, the Makh-ra act as conquerors and oppressors, and even though some of them seem willing to adopt a few human traits and preferences, still they maintain an air of arrogance, the inner conviction that conquest is something of a god-given right stemming from superiority in mind, body and customs.  The Makh-ra, however, also represent the weakest feature of this anthology in my opinion, because they are not alien enough: I’m not speaking about their appearance, which is roughly humanoid except for their taller, stronger frame and the dark, light-sensitive eyes.  The lack of alien-ness I perceived comes from the mind-view that seems more like that of a stolid bureaucrat, rather than that of an off-world creature: granted, this allowed for many of the interesting developments portrayed in the stories, but still I could not avoid the comparison with the Star Trek aliens – my main disappointment with the various incarnations of the series – who are nothing more than humans with strange noses or foreheads. In my opinion, to be truly alien a creature requires one to exhibit some outlandish traits, some quality that is so far removed from our own experience that the sheer otherness of it jumps straight at you. Sadly, that was not the case here, though it was not a major problem.

The quality of the stories is generally good – with anthologies it’s a given that some might appeal more than others – and there are two of them that I found truly outstanding: Strange Alliance (by Cliff Allen) concerning a human who has risen through the Makh-ra ranks to a position of prestige, and Traitor (by Adam Lance Garcia) focusing on the woman who aided and abetted the alien invasion, and the consequences on her personal life.  These two were several steps above the others, breathing life and consistency into their characters.

In short, this is a peculiar kind of collection that’s certainly worth exploring and offers a new outlook on a well-known trope.

My Rating:


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Posted on April 1, 2016, in Reviews and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

  1. I am so bad at reading anthologies. I did eye this one a bit, glad it was worth reading! I do like the way it sounds to be just different POVs rather than completely disjoint.

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  2. I have a weakness for ufo and alien invasion stories! Sad that I don’t usually make enough time to read more of them. I hadn’t heard of this one before, but you can bet I went and looked it up right away after spying your review. Too bad it doesn’t show all the authors (it’s probably somewhere, but even Goodreads doesn’t list them all) I’d be curious if I’ve ever read any of them! Sounds like a fascinating collection, but I definitely worry about the uneven quality of the stories whenever I dive into an unknown anthology.

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    • Anthologies try to offer something for everyone – at least that’s how I see it – so it’s reasonable to assume that we will not like everything they offer. This one was different enough in that it had a common theme and background, and this made it a little more… organic than the others I read until now.
      I’m sorry I can’t give you the list of authors, since the book had a limited viewing time and I can’t access it any longer, but as far as I remember the authors were not familiar names, at least for me.

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  3. Great review, I really liked your reflexion on the lack of alieness of the Makh-ra because I found that it can often be the case with aliens story. They tend to be too human to be credible (and in this way Lagoon by Okorafor was very well done since, the aliens are very different from us, even if they look like us.)
    I sounds like something that I might enjoy so I added it to my wishlist. 🙂

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    • Then I hope you enjoy it! 🙂
      I agree with you about aliens: if there is something I love is an alien who looks like us and is so different – mentally, philosophically, socially – as to make that alien-ness more marked than if he looked like a purple octopus…. 😀

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