Review: INK AND BONE, by Rachel Caine (The Great Library #1)

20643052This is the kind of book that exerts an undeniable appeal on book lovers and compulsive readers like me. Appeal as well as horror, because the idea that books and their contents would be subject to a superior authority empowered to decide who can access the information and what kind of information can be accessed, is indeed the stuff of nightmares.

The premise: in Ink and Bone’s alternate history, the Great Library in Alexandria was never destroyed, all its precious cache of works and knowledge surviving and spreading all around the world with the creation of daughter-libraries. Sadly, a surplus of knowledge does not bring either wisdom or enlightenment: on the contrary the Library has become the most powerful entity in the world, ruling through intimidation and the influence accrued over the centuries.  This… bibliocracy, for want of a better word, has banned the individual property of books, whose ownership is reserved to the Library and its representative delegations: books are still handwritten, since the development of the press never occurred – Gutenberg, and any other inventor ever to approach the idea of mass-produced books, having been mercilessly suppressed as dangerous heretics.

Written works can be read through blanks, devices resembling modern tablets or e-readers and whose contents are owned only temporarily and strictly controlled by the Library, of course. This detail forced me to consider the role of e-readers in our time: useful and practical as they are, they still are a far cry from the effective ownership of a book, or the simple pleasure of holding a cherished volume in one’s hands, of enjoying its smell and texture.  E-books don’t carry the same definitive aura of possession, and this story has done much to strengthen my determination to always keep a backup copy of every e-book I’ve ever bought – just in case. But I digress…

Jess Brightwell belongs to an influential family that has made a sizeable fortune by smuggling books to wealthy customers who can afford the price – and the risk of discovery: when we meet him he’s just a child, and yet his stern, uncompromising father sends him out as a runner, disguised among other children as decoys.  The Garda, the feared Library police, is constantly on the lookout for the young smugglers, often aided by “concerned citizens” ready to point out anything untoward.  Capture might entail death, as already happened to Jess’ older brother Liam, who choose capital punishment rather than betray his family.  Still, Jess’ father sends his child on these missions with apparent disregard for his safety; at some point, Jess recalls those moments with poignant clarity:

[…] He remembered how it had felt in that awful moment of clarity in his childhood, knowing his father would let him die.

A few years later, Brightwell Sr. sends Jess as a postulant to the Library once he turns sixteen: should he succeed in being accepted, he will be able to act as a spy and fifth column for his family – failure to graduate and gain a place in the… enemy camp will leave Jess on his own, because his father is not going to pamper a son who loves books for themselves rather than as a valuable commodity.

These two incidents managed to quickly endear young Jess to me: I have often stressed my lack of patience for trope-laden YA characters who do little but sulk, whine and bemoan the cruelty of the world or their situation – not so with Jess Brightwell, or the other postulants he meets once he reaches the hallowed grounds of the Library.  These are teenagers, yes, but they are depicted with all the true exuberance and hope of youth, the need to excel and to prove themselves to their peers, the drive to learn and make a mark on the world. In other words, they feel real, and completely relatable: the harsh trials they undergo once in Alexandria help to showcase their characters, their strengths and liabilities, and the way they are growing as persons.

What Jess and his fellow postulants soon discover is that the Great Library is not the beacon of knowledge they believed, but rather a brutal tyrant imposing its will by force, both on nations and on individuals: even the high-placed Scholars are not protected from this inflexible rule, on the contrary they are the subjects of intense scrutiny at every moment of their lives.  As the young students forge their way through the lessons, we learn more about this alternate – and dystopian – world, one where steam-driven carriages coexist with the equivalent of tablets, although these are powered by alchemy; a world where fast trains that reminded me of the most advanced mag-lev conveyances stand side-by-side with greek fire and guardian automata.  And a world where bloody wars are waged, like the one between England and Wales: one of the most harrowing passages in this fast-moving, totally absorbing story, covers the baptism of fire mission in which Jess and his friends are called into besieged Oxford to try and save the books stored there before the fall of the city.

Parallel to the story itself, there is a narrative thread carried out through the “Ephemera”, short chapters showcasing bits of Library correspondence exchanged throughout the centuries and giving information on the course of history and on what happens behind the scenes.  Some of the contents of these Ephemera are quite chilling and reveal the pervasive presence of the Library in everyone’s life, and the extremes reached in the pursuit of power.

I’ve often thought that there are shades of Orwell’s 1984 in the Library’s reach into individual lives and in the pursuit of absolute control, in the will to shape the minds of its subjects and to drive home the awareness of the institution’s unlimited power: nothing can be hidden from the Library, not even one’s innermost thoughts and desires.  It’s a very compelling theme, and it’s explored with a great control of pacing and character development: from the young students to their proctor Wolfe to the figures who hold the highest ranks, everyone is painted with subtle strokes and cleverly developed, making the readers care for each of them, making us love or hate them as the story requires.

This might well be one of the most fascinating books I’ve read so far, one that has done a great deal toward curing me of my mistrust toward YA-oriented fiction, and one whose story I more than look forward to reading on.  And Book 2 already beckons from the (virtual) shelf…

My Rating:


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Posted on February 3, 2017, in Reviews and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 18 Comments.

  1. Oh yes, I loved this book so much! I still haven’t read book two, which makes me mad at myself, because book three comes out this year. Such an all-around great book in so many ways, glad you loved it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • You have to consider the advantage of having waited a little before starting book 2: you might end up reading 2 and 3 at a very short distance, or even back to back! It does not look that bad from this point of view, doesn’t it? 😉

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  2. I’ve seen a ton of really positive reviews for this one but none of them have mentioned the Ephemera…that sounds absolutely amazing! This is a series I’ve said I’ll read for almost two years now and somehow I still haven’t got around to it. Any book that can make someone who normally distrusts YA reconsider it is one that I’ve got to read. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, if more authors dealt with YA themes with the same deftness of this author, I would read more of this sub-genre. And this is a book that grabs you from page one and never lets go – for me, it ended far too soon… I hope you enjoy it just as much as I did 🙂

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  3. I loved this one. I was a bit disappointed with the second one, but am hoping the third book finishes the series how it started.

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  4. I am so glad you enjoyed this one! I was just enchanted by the story and the world, and that’s the best way I can put it. Like Lisa, I was a bit disappointed with the sequel though, but I’m hoping that the third book will be end the trilogy with a bang!

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  5. Pretty cover. And certainly a book I want to read. Books, about books. Love it. I also wonder about e-readers under a despot; there is nothing I could do if half my library disappeared tomorrow on the Kindle.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, e-books are far more… fragile than paper books in that respect – and the infamous disappearances I’ve read about concerning the Kindle are the main reason I will never own one. And just to be on the safe side, I have a backup of all my ebooks on an external drive – sometimes a touch of paranoia can be useful… 😀

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  6. This looks great, thanks for the review!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Yes, I’m with Danya – I’ve head this for ages and yet I do really want to read it and this is another great positive review – soon.
    Lynn 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  8. “bibliocracy” <– Awesome 😄

    This one has been on my list for a while now! (I might wait for book III to come out so I don't have to wait in between the last two.) So glad to hear you enjoyed it! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

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