TV Review: STRANGER THINGS (Season 1)

strangerthings

I encountered a great deal of online praise for this series, so that when I had the opportunity to watch it I jumped in eagerly, and with no expectations of any kind, since I knew very little about it. What I found is a small jewel of a story, one that ensnared me completely and led to a quick, compulsive watch.

The story and background have something of a nostalgic feel, thanks to the opening titles that are a clear call-back to the ‘80s – the time period in which the events are set – and to the soundtrack through which we revisit a few hits from those years. Moreover, there is a definite Stephen King vibe to the plot itself, a faint reminiscence of “IT” and “Firestarter”, with some “Carrie” overtones thrown in: which does not mean that the story is derivative, not at all, but rather that it wants to pay homage to the undiscussed master of the genre. And this is just one of the reasons I enjoyed it so much.

In the small town of Hawkins, Indiana, young Will Byers disappears without a trace while returning home after a day spent with his friends Mike, Dustin and Lucas. Local police start the search for the boy, but it’s clear that they are not putting all their hearts and energies into it, so that his three friends decide to start looking on their own.  Meanwhile, a  frightened girl with weird powers manages to escape from a nearby secret government installation and connects with the three friends, who believe she might be able to help them find Will.   Something else escaped from the secret facility, however, some formless creature from an alternate dimension, and the missing people’s count starts to go up…

The undeniable truth that characters are everything comes to the fore here in Stranger Things, because each and every one of them gets the chance to shine and to add his or her own contribution to a very satisfying whole: to my surprise, the young kids were the ones who worked best in the economy of the story.  From my point of view, television rarely fares well with younger characters, either making them too “old” and adult for their age, or excessively playing on the cuteness factor; here, though, kids are kids, and in a delightful, naïve way that portrays them with accuracy, showing at the same time a richness of imagination that’s typical of that age and that is able to navigate the thin border between reality and fantasy with ease and profound belief.

When we first see them, before Will’s disappearance, they are playing at some board game, dealing with dangerous traps and terrifying fictional monsters with gleeful abandon. Once their friend vanishes and the mysterious Eleven literally lands on their doorstep, they are ready to acknowledge her weird powers with the same easy acceptance of gamers who are being offered a special card to play. This does not mean they walk into danger blindfolded, on the contrary their game-playing seems to have prepared them, both mentally and on a practical level, to face the hazards from unbelievable monsters, and uncomprehending adults, with enviable clarity.

Among the adults, the best performance comes from Joyce, Will’s mother, portrayed by Winona Ryder: the distraught desperation of a mother, ready to believe the unbelievable for the sake of her son, is depicted with amazing craft, never going over the top despite the truly crazy paths she chooses to travel. Close second comes Sheriff Hopper (David Harbour), a man marked by a tragic past and walking the very thin line between duty and the need to do the right thing.

Stranger Things, before the tale of weird horror it is on the surface, is above all a tale about marginalized people having to face extraordinary events: Will and his friends are smaller kids, not exactly geared for physicality, and therefore the butt of cruel jokes and constant hazing from the school bullies; Joyce is a single mother, struggling to make ends meet and therefore looked on with suspicion by the closed society of a small town; Sheriff Hopper has a history of drinking as a coping mechanism against his loss, and does not enjoy the full respect of his deputies – the two best (or rather worst) examples of small-minded members of an inward-facing community. And finally Eleven, a child who was taken from her mother at birth because of her peculiar powers, raised and trained by Doctor Brenner (a very disturbing Matthew Modine) with a cold, practical efficiency that to me represents the true horror of the story, even beyond that of the blood-thirsty monster from the parallel reality.

The eight episodes of the first season of Stranger Things manage to concentrate a great deal of story and character development in such a small time frame, and to make the most of that time with a judicious use of pacing and the levels of tension. While the main events do reach a sort of conclusion, the door is left open for further developments – either in the same setting or a different one – and not all mysteries are solved: a choice I greatly appreciated and one that will keep me on the alert for the arrival of Season Two.

My Rating:


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Posted on February 14, 2017, in Reviews and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 26 Comments.

  1. Yay, I’m so glad you love this show! It’s one of my favorites, and I am very picky when it comes to TV shows. I’m SO excited for season two, which unfortunately isn’t starting until October…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh, I absolutely loved this!! Can’t wait for season 2!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I don’t watch much tv these days but I gave this show a try because of Lynn’s raving praise of it. I’m so glad I did! I’m glad you really enjoyed it too, and I can’t wait for season 2 either 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Season 2 can’t come fast enough!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Excellent review! Definitely mirrors my own thoughts about the series.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I wish I had Netflix. I want to watch this damn show.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. BRING ON SEASON 2 – now please! So glad you loved this too. Yay. 😀 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I agree that the kids are the best characters on the show (and they’re all surprisingly gifted actors, too) and I also loved Joyce. Great point about marginalized people and misfits: I read a really interesting article a few months ago about the representation of queer people and queerness in general in this show and I thought it was really well done. I can’t find the link to it right now (of course…sigh) but it talked a lot about how fantasy and “geek culture” was the refuge for lots of queer kids and teens in the 80s. Anyway, super excited for season 2!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. My husband and I binged watched this in 2 nights after work. Very much looking forward to season 2.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. That sounds great! I want to give it a try but sometimes, when there is too much praise for a show I get disappointed, because my expectations are too high xD If that makes sense… I will check out Episode 1 later today and see how I like it.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. trainofthoughts95

    I had so many ‘wow what?’ moments during this the first season! Can’t wait for the second!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I loved this show so much!! So stoked for season two.

    Liked by 1 person

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